Category Archives: Books

Feminist Questions to Ask Yourself While Reading

If you’ve read some of my previous literary analysis posts, you know there is always that feminist voice in the back of my mind while I read, critiquing the novel’s treatment of women. While this may dampen my enjoyment of some works, it helps me to be a more engaged and aware member of society. So how do you train yourself to start analyzing the feminist merit of a book? It comes from asking a series of questions while you read. You can also adapt these questions to check for representation of other minority groups as well, such as LGBTQ, people of color, people with disabilities, etc. Continue reading Feminist Questions to Ask Yourself While Reading

Daily Geekette’s Favorite Activist Authors

Yesterday, March 8th, was International Women’s Day as well as the “Day without a Woman”  protest arranged by the organizers of the Women’s March. March as a whole is also Women’s History Month. In honor of these events, I thought I would share with you lovely readers some of my favorite female activist authors. Some were authors first, some activists first, but all deserve to be celebrated. Continue reading Daily Geekette’s Favorite Activist Authors

Sunday Sundries: A Nerdy News Recap – Feb 26th-Mar 4th.

It’s hard to believe it, but 2017 has already rolled the calendar to March!  Whether or not the new month has come in like a lion or a lamb in your current locale, there is one constant when it comes to the third month of the year: it’s National Women’s History Month. If you’d like to learn more about NWHM, or see what other interesting and intriguing newsy tidbits you might have missed this week, please keep reading!

Continue reading Sunday Sundries: A Nerdy News Recap – Feb 26th-Mar 4th.

The Gal-lery: Octavia E. Butler & Nnedi Okorafor.

As Black History Month draws to a close, some of the members here at the Daily Geekette would like to help the celebration continue by suggesting some of our favorite books by black writers, both past and present.

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Continue reading The Gal-lery: Octavia E. Butler & Nnedi Okorafor.

Double Book Review: The Radius of Us and Dreadnought

It feels like in our current political environment, the need for diverse books and stories about people in different places with different identities — both real and fictional — is only growing. The Radius of Us is the second novel by Marie Marquardt dealing with the Latinx immigrant community around Atlanta, GA. Dreadnought: Nemesis-Book One is the debut novel of trans author April Daniels, and is set in a version of our world where superheroes are real, and the new hero to inherit the Dreadnought mantle just happens to be a 15-year-old trans girl who is yet to come out to her parents.

Continue reading Double Book Review: The Radius of Us and Dreadnought

How to Start Your Own Geeky Book Club

Did you know that the reason I write for this blog is because of a book club? In high school I bonded with Co-Editor-in-Chief Kayla through a YA Sci-fi & Fantasy book club that she ran at the local Borders (R.I.P.). Book clubs are a great way to meet fellow book geeks and nerd out about your favorite genre. But what do you do if you can’t find the perfect book club in your area? Start your own, of course. I’ll tell you how. Continue reading How to Start Your Own Geeky Book Club

Top 5 Anime Duos of 2016

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The cast of Kiss Him, Not Me

While a fan of romantic comedies, I’ve often felt that they, intentionally or not, tend to “lessen” the value of other kinds of relationships. I find it difficult to immerse myself in stories where the characters don’t much exist outside of the main couple and their problems. It’s just as important to recognize the love between friends and siblings, so in celebration of Valentine’s Day, I’ll be listing both platonic and romantic pairings for my Top 5 Anime Duos of 2016.

Continue reading Top 5 Anime Duos of 2016

Feminist Literary Analysis: The Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss

The new epic fantasy on everybody’s lips is the Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss, not least because of its recent association with musical genius Lin-Manuel Miranda. Miranda will act as creative producer of Liongate’s new film, TV, and video game franchise based on the books. This fact and the recommendation of a dear friend was all the convincing I needed to start book one, The Name of the Wind. Yet while the writing is beautiful and the plot is enticing, I am disappointed to say this book had a distinctly un-feminist tone. Continue reading Feminist Literary Analysis: The Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss

Book Review: “The Bear and the Nightingale” by Katherine Arden

The first in a new trilogy set in medieval Rus’, The Bear and the Nightingale tells the story of Vasilisa Petrovna growing up in the northern forests with the ability to see the spirits and creatures that others believe to be only fairy tales. Conflict arises between Vasya (a pet name) and her new, devout stepmother, Anna, who refuses to follow the old pagan customs from the fairy tales Vasya loves and knows to be real.

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Continue reading Book Review: “The Bear and the Nightingale” by Katherine Arden

Reads of the Resistance: What Books Inspired the Women’s Marchers

From Boston to New York to Washington, D.C., many of the Geekettes attended Women’s Marches last Saturday. And wherever we go, our love of reading goes with us! Books can be transformative, introducing readers to new ideas and perspectives. So that’s why we decided to ask the people we met at the march about feminist books that impacted their lives. Here are some of our results: Continue reading Reads of the Resistance: What Books Inspired the Women’s Marchers